Category Archives: Recipes/Food

Jellied Eels… Yum! (?)

Jellied Eels… Yum! (?)

In the 1700s, the Thames River in London was replete with eels. Surprisingly easy to catch, these slippery creatures were free for the grabbing, nutritious, and tasty. Nets were set upriver, and the bountiful harvests quickly became a dietary staple for London’s poor. On top of being cheap, they were easy to prepare. The simplest… CONTINUE READING…

Thanksgiving in the United States

Thanksgiving in the United States

Because I’ve written so many blogs about this fabulous and unique American holiday, I am not going crazy re-posting them separately. Instead, here are links to those past blogs, which cover everything from trivia, games to entertain during the holiday, recipes, and of course the history of Thanksgiving Day itself. If interested, click the links… CONTINUE READING…

Timeless Recipe: Lemmon Cream

Timeless Recipe: Lemmon Cream

Inspired by my post on Tuesday uncovering the history of lemons and limes, I went searching for old recipes and stumbled across a great website: Cooking in the Archives  A search of the site revealed no recipes featuring limes but a total of six with lemon as a main ingredient. I will only share one… CONTINUE READING…

Lemons and Limes

Lemons and Limes

While preparing the latest Vocabulary Rocks! edition for the letter L — read that blog HERE – I was fascinated by the histories of these common citrus fruits. Rather than go into depth on a vocabulary blog when there are so many other interesting L words, I decided to devote a whole article to these… CONTINUE READING…

Autumn Beverages, hot and cold

Autumn Beverages, hot and cold

Over the years I have posted multiple blogs containing recipes for cold weather drinks, both hot and chilled. Listed below are links to previous beverage-related blogs, some of which contain histories of these drinks. For today, I again scoured through Pinterest for unique beverages that fit into the autumn season. Of course, pumpkin flavored drinks… CONTINUE READING…

Butter Molds and Butter Stamps

Butter Molds and Butter Stamps

The main objective in keeping cows was to supply the needs of the family for milk and butter. Butter was produced as an essential in the diet of most people, the art of making butter, therefore, originating in the home. Not until well into the 19th century was butter commercially produced by large dairies. Prior… CONTINUE READING…

Sweet Autumn Recipes

Sweet Autumn Recipes

Continuing from Tuesday’s post with savory recipes for the autumn season, here are an assortment of recipes for the sweet tooth. Naturally, pumpkin tends to rule as an ingredient for autumn desserts but don’t forget it is also the season for nuts, cranberries, and late ripening berries. Finding recipes to fit a harvest theme dinner… CONTINUE READING…

Savory Autumn Recipes

Savory Autumn Recipes

These foods are in season in fall and are the perfect addition to your diet: Root vegetables: Carrots, any type of squash, pumpkin, and sweet potatoes Whole grains: Brown rice, wholewheat pasta, quinoa, and oats Legumes: Lentils, beans, chickpeas, soybeans. Green vegetables: Broccoli, spinach, kale, and artichokes Fruit: Apples, pomegranates, citrus fruits, and pears Recipes with vegetables and fruits which… CONTINUE READING…

Bubble and Squeak

Bubble and Squeak

Originating in Ireland, bubble and squeak migrated into England as a common breakfast meal somewhere before the middle of the eighteenth century. As a dish with the sole purpose to not waste leftover food from dinner the night before, it was essentially a mish-mash of vegetables shredded or chopped small and combined with slivers of… CONTINUE READING…

Scotch Eggs

Scotch Eggs

Last Friday I published a blog on Picnic History. One of the essential features of a good picnic was food that could withstand packing and travel, and that was easy to pick up and eat. This instantly brought to mind a blog I wrote a very long time ago for Austen Authors on strange foods,… CONTINUE READING…

Here we come a-wassailing!

Here we come a-wassailing!

The general opinion is that wassailing is all about the apples and/or an ancient pagan ritual. Neither is true, but the origins are interesting nevertheless. Earliest traces are to a simple Anglo-Saxon/Old Norse toast — Waes Hael! — which translates to “be hale!” To this wish for good health, a fellow drinker would respond, Drinc Hael! As may… CONTINUE READING…