Gunpowder Flasks

Gunpowder Flasks

Powder flasks have been in use since the early 15th century to carry the black powder necessary in the use of firearms. Whether made from ox or cow horns (appropriately called a “powder horn”) or from wood and iron, powder flasks had to not only hold the black powder, but also keep the powder dry.… CONTINUE READING…

Ball Gown, October 1816

Ball Gown, October 1816

This wonderful fashion print from Ackermann’s Repository of Arts for October 1816 depicts a woman in a white and pink ball dress with a white shawl, gloves, and a headdress. The dress is pink with a white translucent over-layer with white detailing around the neckline and hem as well as red, yellow, and green floral… CONTINUE READING…

Skin Care for the Regency Lady

Skin Care for the Regency Lady

In an era before Avon or Mary Kay, the fair maidens of the Regency Era relied upon homemade concoctions. Fortunately, well-bred ladies weren’t without resources. Magazines of the day devoted pages to the topic of cosmetics and skin care, in between fashion plates and gossip. Then, in 1811, a publication titled The Mirror of the… CONTINUE READING…

Vocabulary Rocks! Reduplication Rhyming Words

Vocabulary Rocks! Reduplication Rhyming Words

The repeating of parts of words to make new forms is called reduplication. There are various categories of reduplication words: rhyming, for example okey-dokey exact, for example wee-wee ablaut (vowel substitution), for example zig-zag The impetus for the coining of these seems to be nothing more than the enjoyment of wordplay. The words that make up… CONTINUE READING…

Bubble and Squeak

Bubble and Squeak

Originating in Ireland, bubble and squeak migrated into England as a common breakfast meal somewhere before the middle of the eighteenth century. As a dish with the sole purpose to not waste leftover food from dinner the night before, it was essentially a mish-mash of vegetables shredded or chopped small and combined with slivers of… CONTINUE READING…

BACK to BLOGGING! Giveaway Winners!

BACK to BLOGGING! Giveaway Winners!

My big BACK TO BLOGGING GIVEAWAY is over so it is time to announce the winners. So exciting! I will be attempting to contact each winner by email, but of course cannot guarantee the mail-gremlins will not chew it up and spit into a spam folder! If your name is below, please respond to the… CONTINUE READING…

For Precious Infant Heads: Pudding Caps

For Precious Infant Heads: Pudding Caps

In the eighteenth century, children’s clothing underwent a gradual evolution from constricting garments patterned after those worn by adults to loose fitting dresses similar to those worn by women the standard apparel for both sexes. Along with this philosophy of freedom, the practice of swaddling infants tightly became a thing of the past. While clearly… CONTINUE READING…

Evening Dress, September 1812

Evening Dress, September 1812

Fashion plates showed women and dressmakers what fashionable society was wearing in London and Paris. In 1812, a neoclassical look with tubular silhouette, empire waist, and open neckline reigned for London’s evening events. This evening dress from the September 1812 volume of Ackermann’s Repository of Arts publication features sleeves that are gathered at intervals with… CONTINUE READING…

Curling Irons, not as new as you might think

Curling Irons, not as new as you might think

The first, actual “curling iron” was patented by Sir Hiram Maxim (the same fellow who invented the machine gun) in 1866, but the device itself dates back over 6000 years. Considering antique curling tongs are seen or referred to in numerous cultures, it is doubtful a single person is responsible for the invention. Beauty is… CONTINUE READING…