Henry Brougham

Henry Brougham

Henry Peter Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (September 19, 1778 – May 7, 1868) Henry Brougham was born in Edinburgh, the son of a modest landowner without title but of an influential family in the Cumberland area for centuries. Young Henry was educated by the public school system in Edinburgh before entering the University… CONTINUE READING…

States of the Union #5

States of the Union #5

Day #5 of what will be a ten-part series covering all of the fifty States of the Union comprising the United States of America. I am a proud American, particularly regarding our remarkable history, so for ten consecutive Wednesdays each blog post will spotlight FIVE States (chosen at random). There will be some trivia, facts… CONTINUE READING…

States of the Union #4

States of the Union #4

Today I am continuing what will be a ten-part series covering all of the fifty States of the Union comprising the United States of America. I am a proud American, particularly regarding our remarkable history, so for ten consecutive Wednesdays each blog post will spotlight FIVE States (chosen at random). There will be some trivia,… CONTINUE READING…

Sewing Needlecase

Sewing Needlecase

  Early sewing needles were precious items that were easily lost, therefore, needlecases were a necessity for storing these fragile objects. Example are found in cultures around the world. Tubular bronze needlecases are common finds from Viking-age sites in Europe, cane needlecases were found in a Peruvian grave dated to 1000–147, and bone, leather, and metal… CONTINUE READING…

States of the Union #3

States of the Union #3

Today I am continuing what will be a ten-part series covering all of the fifty States of the Union comprising the United States of America. I am a proud American, particularly regarding our remarkable history, so for ten consecutive Wednesdays each blog post will spotlight FIVE States (chosen at random). There will be some trivia,… CONTINUE READING…

The Follies at Barwick Park in Somerset

The Follies at Barwick Park in Somerset

BARWICK PARK is a landscape park located near the city of Yeovil in South Somerset. The enormous estate was once the property of Syon Abbey, but then passed through various owners after Henry VIII’s Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1530s. Documentation during these centuries are sketchy, including the acquisition around 1770 by Quaker and landowner… CONTINUE READING…

What is that thing? An Epergne!

What is that thing? An Epergne!

By the 18th century, entertaining had developed into a grand art with dinner consisting of a dozen or more courses extending for hours. Fancy does not begin to describe a properly adorned dining table! Every piece of cutlery, the linens, and serving dishes were of the finest quality and workmanship. As important as the aesthetics… CONTINUE READING…

States of the Union #2

States of the Union #2

Today I am continuing what will be a ten-part series covering all of the fifty States of the Union comprising the United States of America. I am a proud American, particularly regarding our remarkable history, so for ten consecutive Wednesdays each blog post will spotlight FIVE States (chosen at random). There will be some trivia,… CONTINUE READING…

A brief history of Soap, and Soap Containers

A brief history of Soap, and Soap Containers

Soap has an ancient history, literally dating back thousands of years. Made of animal fats, lye, and ashes, the process of making soap was arduous and time-consuming. The “recipes” varied slightly over the centuries and depending on the ingredients available, but no matter what the intended use of the soap (to clean the body or… CONTINUE READING…

The British Museum at Montagu House

The British Museum at Montagu House

Founded by Parliament in 1753, the British Museum was the first national, public museum in the world. Located at Montagu House in Bloomsbury, the gardens opened in 1757 and the museum in 1759, with a beginning collection of over 71,000 antiquities donated by physician and naturalist Sir Hans Sloane.     Initially, the collections were… CONTINUE READING…

Canterbury Stand

Canterbury Stand

A Canterbury is a low, open-topped stand with slatted partitions and a drawer beneath, sometimes with short legs on casters, designed for holding sheet music. Originally found in England during the 1780s, they were made in mahogany from about 1800, and later in rosewood and walnut. In a period when printed music was more widely available and disseminated due to… CONTINUE READING…

States of the Union #1

States of the Union #1

This is a new series focusing on the fifty States of the Union comprising the United States of America. Despite the mess my beloved country in is these days, I am still a proud American, particularly regarding our remarkable history. So beginning today, and on the subsequent nine Wednesdays, each blog post will spotlight FIVE… CONTINUE READING…

Ormolu, a gilding technique

Ormolu, a gilding technique

Ormolu (from French or moulu, “ground or pounded/powdered gold”) is strictly speaking the technique of applying a gold amalgam (gilding) to a metal object, typically one of bronze. The finished product was not only beautiful, but sturdier, practical, and cheaper… comparatively speaking. Making ormolu was an arduous process involving complex stages even before it was ready… CONTINUE READING…