Category Archives: Fashion/Clothing

January Fashion Plates: 1821 & 1824

January Fashion Plates: 1821 & 1824

Today’s fashion plate choices for January are chosen from later in the Regency Era. Notice how far the waist fell from 1821 to 1824, as well as the increased puffiness of the sleeves at the shoulders. In both plates, the bonnets are much larger than typically seen during the earlier years of the Regency. Promenade… CONTINUE READING…

Silk and Taffeta

Silk and Taffeta

SILK is a natural fiber, some forms of which can be woven into textiles. The highest quality silk is obtained from the cocoons made by the larvae of mulberry silkworms – Bombyx mori – which are raised in captivity in a process called sericulture. Other caterpillars produce “wild silks” that do not have the same… CONTINUE READING…

Sock Darners

Sock Darners

As a followup of sorts to my blog a couple of weeks ago on the history of stockings, it only made sense to pass on a bit of information on a device invented to mend those delicate foot and leg coverings. Socks and stockings have a bad tendency to wear through the heels and rip… CONTINUE READING…

January Fashion Plates: 1809 & 1816

January Fashion Plates: 1809 & 1816

For today, I am sharing two Fashion Plates from January editions of Ackermann’s “Repository of Arts” for your Regency fashion viewing pleasure. First up is a morning dress from January 1809— Fashion plate, hand-colored aquatint from Rudolph Ackermann’s “Repository of Arts”, Series 1, Vol. I, Plate 1, No. 1, January 1809. Modern description: “Depicts a… CONTINUE READING…

Fashions for December 1808 & 1815

Fashions for December 1808 & 1815

Finding fashion plates that are clearly for Christmas is essentially impossible as it does not seem that designs were specifically made for the season. Greenery, as in mistletoe and other evergreens, were popular as home decor, but as for the theme of “red and green” which we are familiar with today, it does not seem… CONTINUE READING…

Two Fashion Plates for November

Two Fashion Plates for November

The day before Thanksgiving here in the US, I know I will be busy and suspect many of my visitors will be as well. So, rather than a lengthy blog, here are two lovely gowns from November fashion magazines during the Regency for your viewing pleasure.   This first fashion plate is an Evening Dress from… CONTINUE READING…

Hazards of a Windy Day ~ Watch Out!

Hazards of a Windy Day ~ Watch Out!

We are fully into the autumn season here in the Northern Hemisphere, with winter fast approaching. Thus, as the days grow shorter, the weather becomes increasingly unpredictable. Today, your friendly author comes to you with a word of warning and a visual reminder of the potential hazards to being caught unaware by an abrupt gust… CONTINUE READING…

About Pattens

About Pattens

For the bulk of human history, even in the most advanced, cosmopolitan cities (such as London), streets were rough and downright filthy. Typically unpaved, mud was inevitable and thick. Garbage and human waste were commonly tossed from windows onto the street below, and imagine the quantity of horse droppings that must have been impossible to… CONTINUE READING…

Ball Gown, October 1816

Ball Gown, October 1816

This wonderful fashion print from Ackermann’s Repository of Arts for October 1816 depicts a woman in a white and pink ball dress with a white shawl, gloves, and a headdress. The dress is pink with a white translucent over-layer with white detailing around the neckline and hem as well as red, yellow, and green floral… CONTINUE READING…

For Precious Infant Heads: Pudding Caps

For Precious Infant Heads: Pudding Caps

In the eighteenth century, children’s clothing underwent a gradual evolution from constricting garments patterned after those worn by adults to loose fitting dresses similar to those worn by women the standard apparel for both sexes. Along with this philosophy of freedom, the practice of swaddling infants tightly became a thing of the past. While clearly… CONTINUE READING…

Evening Dress, September 1812

Evening Dress, September 1812

Fashion plates showed women and dressmakers what fashionable society was wearing in London and Paris. In 1812, a neoclassical look with tubular silhouette, empire waist, and open neckline reigned for London’s evening events. This evening dress from the September 1812 volume of Ackermann’s Repository of Arts publication features sleeves that are gathered at intervals with… CONTINUE READING…

Fun to Poke Fun at the Dandies!

Fun to Poke Fun at the Dandies!

“If people turn to look at you on the street, you are not well dressed.” The above quote is attributed to George Bryan “Beau” Brummell, and he wasn’t being ironic. Brummell was the trendsetter and undisputed master of the perfect tailoring and simplicity of understated style which became a hallmark of the fashionable Regency Era… CONTINUE READING…