Category Archives: Fashion/Clothing

Sewing Needlecase

Sewing Needlecase

  Early sewing needles were precious items that were easily lost, therefore, needlecases were a necessity for storing these fragile objects. Example are found in cultures around the world. Tubular bronze needlecases are common finds from Viking-age sites in Europe, cane needlecases were found in a Peruvian grave dated to 1000–147, and bone, leather, and metal… CONTINUE READING…

Easter Bonnets and Hats

Easter Bonnets and Hats

Credit for the EASTER BONNET in American culture is given to the song “Easter Parade” written in 1933 by Irving Berlin. More on this in a moment, but it must be noted that while partially true, special bonnets or hats for Easter pre-date Mr. Berlin by a long mile and are not an American invention.… CONTINUE READING…

March Fashion Plates: 1809 & 1815

March Fashion Plates: 1809 & 1815

For the month of March, I have two Fashion Plates from magazines of the Regency Era. As always, the descriptions are from the magazine itself and from contemporary commentaries, if available. Opera Dress from March 1809— Fashion plate; hand-colored aquatint from Rudolph Ackermann’s “Repository of Arts,” Series 1, Vol. I, Plate 11, No. 3 March… CONTINUE READING…

Tippet ~ the Regency boa

Tippet ~ the Regency boa

Today we would more accurately call these scarf-like fashion items a boa or stole. In the past, however, a “stole” primarily referred to the ecclesiastical garment, and the term “boa” was only used for the snake! Not until 1838 would “boa” begin to supplant the garment known as the tippet.   The tippet evolved from… CONTINUE READING…

Two February 1817 Fashion Plates

Two February 1817 Fashion Plates

For the final fashion plate focus for February, these two ensembles are both from the 1817 issue of Ackermann’s Repository of Arts.   Carriage Dress from February 1817— Fashion plate; hand-colored aquatint from Rudolph Ackermann’s “Repository of Arts”, Series 2, Vol. III, Plate 10, No. 14, February 1, 1817. Depicts woman standing in a long… CONTINUE READING…

February Fashion Plates: 1809 & 1815

February Fashion Plates: 1809 & 1815

For the month of February, I have two Fashion Plates from magazines of the Regency Era. As always, the descriptions are from the magazine itself and from contemporary commentaries, if available.   Half Dress from February 1809— Fashion plate; hand-colored aquatint from Rudolph Ackermann’s “Repository of Arts” Series 1, Volume 1, Plate 5, No. 2,… CONTINUE READING…

Fans: Hand-held and Cockade

Fans: Hand-held and Cockade

FANS have been around for centuries, probably since the dawn of time if we include waving big leaves in front of one’s face. The first man-made fan is agreed to be the rigid type, like those in the collage below. Made of wood, thick fabrics, leather, papier-mache, or big feathers closely stitched together into a… CONTINUE READING…

January Fashion Plates: 1821 & 1824

January Fashion Plates: 1821 & 1824

Today’s fashion plate choices for January are chosen from later in the Regency Era. Notice how far the waist fell from 1821 to 1824, as well as the increased puffiness of the sleeves at the shoulders. In both plates, the bonnets are much larger than typically seen during the earlier years of the Regency. Promenade… CONTINUE READING…

Silk and Taffeta

Silk and Taffeta

SILK is a natural fiber, some forms of which can be woven into textiles. The highest quality silk is obtained from the cocoons made by the larvae of mulberry silkworms – Bombyx mori – which are raised in captivity in a process called sericulture. Other caterpillars produce “wild silks” that do not have the same… CONTINUE READING…

Sock Darners

Sock Darners

As a followup of sorts to my blog a couple of weeks ago on the history of stockings, it only made sense to pass on a bit of information on a device invented to mend those delicate foot and leg coverings. Socks and stockings have a bad tendency to wear through the heels and rip… CONTINUE READING…

January Fashion Plates: 1809 & 1816

January Fashion Plates: 1809 & 1816

For today, I am sharing two Fashion Plates from January editions of Ackermann’s “Repository of Arts” for your Regency fashion viewing pleasure. First up is a morning dress from January 1809— Fashion plate, hand-colored aquatint from Rudolph Ackermann’s “Repository of Arts”, Series 1, Vol. I, Plate 1, No. 1, January 1809. Modern description: “Depicts a… CONTINUE READING…

Fashions for December 1808 & 1815

Fashions for December 1808 & 1815

Finding fashion plates that are clearly for Christmas is essentially impossible as it does not seem that designs were specifically made for the season. Greenery, as in mistletoe and other evergreens, were popular as home decor, but as for the theme of “red and green” which we are familiar with today, it does not seem… CONTINUE READING…

Two Fashion Plates for November

Two Fashion Plates for November

The day before Thanksgiving here in the US, I know I will be busy and suspect many of my visitors will be as well. So, rather than a lengthy blog, here are two lovely gowns from November fashion magazines during the Regency for your viewing pleasure.   This first fashion plate is an Evening Dress from… CONTINUE READING…

Hazards of a Windy Day ~ Watch Out!

Hazards of a Windy Day ~ Watch Out!

We are fully into the autumn season here in the Northern Hemisphere, with winter fast approaching. Thus, as the days grow shorter, the weather becomes increasingly unpredictable. Today, your friendly author comes to you with a word of warning and a visual reminder of the potential hazards to being caught unaware by an abrupt gust… CONTINUE READING…