1813 & 1814 Gowns from Incroyables et Merveilleuses

1813 & 1814 Gowns from Incroyables et Merveilleuses

Incroyable et Merveilleuse was a set of 33 engravings, published in 1814, depicting extremely fashionable French men and women. They were engraved by George-Jacques Gatine after drawings by Horace Vernet and Louis-Marie Lanté. While most fashion plates were on a small scale designed to fit in women’s magazines such as the Journal des Dames (which… Continue Reading

Easter Week ~ Maundy Thursday

Easter Week ~ Maundy Thursday

Today is Maundy Thursday, also referred to as Holy Thursday or Covenant Thursday or Great Thursday. The term “Maundy” comes from the Latin mandatum which means “command” and refers to the command Jesus issued on the last Thursday of His life, which was to “love one another as I have loved you.” Royal Maundy is an… Continue Reading

The Incredible, Edible Peeps!

The Incredible, Edible Peeps!

Peeps are marshmallow candies, sold in the United States and Canada, that are shaped into chicks, bunnies, and other animals. There are also different shapes used for various holidays. Peeps are used primarily to fill Easter baskets, though recent ad campaigns tout the candy as “Peeps – Always in Season”. They are made from marshmallow,… Continue Reading

Traditional Easter Food

Traditional Easter Food

Today is Shrove Tuesday — also known as “Mardi Gras” or “Fat Tuesday” — the day before Lent begins on Ash Wednesday. Traditionally viewed as a day of repentance, Shrove Tuesday has become a day of celebration and feasting before the period of fasting required during the Lenten season. The name Shrove is derived from the old… Continue Reading

1818 Walking Dress, Ackermanns

1818 Walking Dress, Ackermanns

Fashion print is from the March 1818 issue of Ackermann’s Repository of Arts fashion magazine. The image to the right is the original plate, faded and yellowed over time. Below is the fashion plate as refined by me. The print was described in the magazine as follows: “A fawn-coloured poplin gown made half-length: the back… Continue Reading

Orgeat ~ What is that?

Orgeat ~ What is that?

ORGEAT – the drink with the odd pronunciation (I will explain in a moment), is never mentioned by Jane Austen, either in a letter or her novels, but surely would have been known to her. Mentions of Orgeat being served at Almacks and other Society gatherings are scattered throughout letters and commentaries dated during the… Continue Reading