Girandole

Girandole is an ornamental branched candlestick or light fixture consisting of several lights, often resembling a small chandelier. Girandoles came into use about the second half of the 17th century as a luxurious appliance for lighting and were commonly made and used in pairs.

A great variety of metals were used (gilded bronze, copper, and silver were most popular) as well as hardwoods, with crystal and glass accents. A true girandole stood on a tabletop, although the name was later applied to elaborate dangling lighting devices attached to mirrors and furniture.

For today’s blog, I am sharing a clipping and drawing from page 366 of the 1821 publication of Ackermann’s Repository of Arts, Literature, Fashion, etc.

 

There are many surviving examples of candlestick style girandoles. I have several on my Lighting Historical board on Pinterest. The pair shown as the featured image are from the George III period, c.1790. The one below is a Russian example from the late-18th century described as: “Gilded bronze with cut-glass, red stem glass, clear glass obelisk, and white marble base.” Gorgeous!

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Sharon Lathan

Sharon Lathan is the best-selling author of The Darcy Saga, a ten-volume sequel series to Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice.

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