Category Archives: Regency

Skin Care for the Regency Lady

Skin Care for the Regency Lady

In an era before Avon or Mary Kay, the fair maidens of the Regency Era relied upon homemade concoctions. Fortunately, well-bred ladies weren’t without resources. Magazines of the day devoted pages to the topic of cosmetics and skin care, in between fashion plates and gossip. Then, in 1811, a publication titled The Mirror of the… CONTINUE READING…

Fun to Poke Fun at the Dandies!

Fun to Poke Fun at the Dandies!

“If people turn to look at you on the street, you are not well dressed.” The above quote is attributed to George Bryan “Beau” Brummell, and he wasn’t being ironic. Brummell was the trendsetter and undisputed master of the perfect tailoring and simplicity of understated style which became a hallmark of the fashionable Regency Era… CONTINUE READING…

What IS a Sugar-plum?

What IS a Sugar-plum?

According to Clement Clark Moore, sugar-plums are so special that of all the possible delights a child might dream of, they top the list. The children were nestled all snug in their beds, While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads… So what exactly are these “sugar-plums” dancing in dreamland? At first glance the “sugar”… CONTINUE READING…

Washington Irving ~ Christmas in the Regency ~ An Excerpt from “A Darcy Christmas”

Washington Irving ~ Christmas in the Regency ~ An Excerpt from “A Darcy Christmas”

Santa Claus, tinsel on trees, Frosty the Snowman, reindeer pulling a sleigh… These are a few of the current Christmas images we are familiar with in the US. What about yule logs, a boar’s head, community wassail bowls, a king of misrule, mince meat pies, and figgy pudding? Rarely are these traditions seen here in the… CONTINUE READING…

Here we come a-wassailing!

Here we come a-wassailing!

The general opinion is that wassailing is all about the apples and/or an ancient pagan ritual. Neither is true, but the origins are interesting nevertheless. Earliest traces are to a simple Anglo-Saxon/Old Norse toast — Waes Hael! — which translates to “be hale!” To this wish for good health, a fellow drinker would respond, Drinc Hael! As may… CONTINUE READING…

Fowl for Christmas Dinner, in History and Today

Fowl for Christmas Dinner, in History and Today

Food historians tell us the practice of serving large, stuffed fowl for Christmas is like many other Christian holiday food traditions in that the idea was borrowed from earlier cultural traditions. Peacocks, swans, geese, duck, pheasant, guinea fowl, and turkeys have topped the list for centuries. The larger the bird, the more festive the presence.… CONTINUE READING…

Christmas Menu for 1660

Christmas Menu for 1660

The earliest published Christmas menu dates from 1660, the year of Charles II’s restoration to the throne. The Accomplisht Cook was written by Robert May, an English chef who trained in France and cooked for nobility throughout his life. This remarkable document includes a section titled “A bill of fare for Christmas Day and how to set… CONTINUE READING…