Category Archives: Regency

The Follies at Barwick Park in Somerset

The Follies at Barwick Park in Somerset

BARWICK PARK is a landscape park located near the city of Yeovil in South Somerset. The enormous estate was once the property of Syon Abbey, but then passed through various owners after Henry VIII’s Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1530s. Documentation during these centuries are sketchy, including the acquisition around 1770 by Quaker and landowner… CONTINUE READING…

What is that thing? An Epergne!

What is that thing? An Epergne!

By the 18th century, entertaining had developed into a grand art with dinner consisting of a dozen or more courses extending for hours. Fancy does not begin to describe a properly adorned dining table! Every piece of cutlery, the linens, and serving dishes were of the finest quality and workmanship. As important as the aesthetics… CONTINUE READING…

Canterbury Stand

Canterbury Stand

A Canterbury is a low, open-topped stand with slatted partitions and a drawer beneath, sometimes with short legs on casters, designed for holding sheet music. Originally found in England during the 1780s, they were made in mahogany from about 1800, and later in rosewood and walnut. In a period when printed music was more widely available and disseminated due to… CONTINUE READING…

Ormolu, a gilding technique

Ormolu, a gilding technique

Ormolu (from French or moulu, “ground or pounded/powdered gold”) is strictly speaking the technique of applying a gold amalgam (gilding) to a metal object, typically one of bronze. The finished product was not only beautiful, but sturdier, practical, and cheaper… comparatively speaking. Making ormolu was an arduous process involving complex stages even before it was ready… CONTINUE READING…

The Miseries of Human Life

The Miseries of Human Life

The Miseries of Human Life is a book written by James Beresford (1764–1840) and published in 1806, first as a single volume and then as an expanded two-volume edition later that year. Illustrated by George Cruikshank, it catalogued “in excruciating detail” the “petty outrages, minor humiliations, and tiny discomforts that make up everyday human existence.”… CONTINUE READING…

Tippet ~ the Regency boa

Tippet ~ the Regency boa

Today we would more accurately call these scarf-like fashion items a boa or stole. In the past, however, a “stole” primarily referred to the ecclesiastical garment, and the term “boa” was only used for the snake! Not until 1838 would “boa” begin to supplant the garment known as the tippet.   The tippet evolved from… CONTINUE READING…

Two February 1817 Fashion Plates

Two February 1817 Fashion Plates

For the final fashion plate focus for February, these two ensembles are both from the 1817 issue of Ackermann’s Repository of Arts.   Carriage Dress from February 1817— Fashion plate; hand-colored aquatint from Rudolph Ackermann’s “Repository of Arts”, Series 2, Vol. III, Plate 10, No. 14, February 1, 1817. Depicts woman standing in a long… CONTINUE READING…

Georgian Garden: The Ha-Ha

Georgian Garden: The Ha-Ha

A “Georgian Garden” is defined by the UK National Trust as one which dates from 1714 to 1830. In previous blogs I have written about the men and women who designed and maintained these massive parks, and I have also given a historical overview of landscape styles during this period of time. Those blogs can… CONTINUE READING…

February Fashion Plates: 1809 & 1815

February Fashion Plates: 1809 & 1815

For the month of February, I have two Fashion Plates from magazines of the Regency Era. As always, the descriptions are from the magazine itself and from contemporary commentaries, if available.   Half Dress from February 1809— Fashion plate; hand-colored aquatint from Rudolph Ackermann’s “Repository of Arts” Series 1, Volume 1, Plate 5, No. 2,… CONTINUE READING…

Need Valentine Help? Richardson’s Valentine Writer is the answer!

Need Valentine Help? Richardson’s Valentine Writer is the answer!

In 1828, British publisher Thomas Richardson provided the gentlemen of England a twenty-six page pamphlet full of Valentine’s Day samples to use in conducting affairs of the heart. As often seen with publications from the days of yore, the title is recorded from the whole front page and extraordinarily long— Richardson’s New London fashionable gentleman’s… CONTINUE READING…

January Fashion Plates: 1821 & 1824

January Fashion Plates: 1821 & 1824

Today’s fashion plate choices for January are chosen from later in the Regency Era. Notice how far the waist fell from 1821 to 1824, as well as the increased puffiness of the sleeves at the shoulders. In both plates, the bonnets are much larger than typically seen during the earlier years of the Regency. Promenade… CONTINUE READING…

Foot Warmers: Keeping a Carriage Warm

Foot Warmers: Keeping a Carriage Warm

Prior to electric and gas heating, if one traveled in cold weather a foot warmer of some kind in your unheated carriage, sleigh, or train compartment was a common, desirable solution. Known as foot warmers, or foot stoves by the Dutch, the simplest were punched tin in a wooden frame with an earthenware or iron… CONTINUE READING…