Hot Chocolate with “Spice”

Hot Chocolate with “Spice”

Want your hot chocolate with a bit of kick to it? There are several ways to bring zing to an old standard. Variations for the over 21 crowd are myriad, essentially hot chocolate or hot cocoa cooked the desired way and then “spiked” with one’s preferred alcohol. Possibilities include: bourbon, Kahlua, rum, whiskey, brandy, vodka, Bailey’s Irish Cream, peppermint schnapps, and more. Just about any liquor or liqueur will work. Here are two recipes that struck me as a bit more unique.

 

red-wine-hot-choc
*click for website recipe details & images

 

hot-chocobeer
*click for website recipe details & images

 

Of course, spicing up a batch of hot chocolate can refer to exactly that: adding spices! Mexican Hot Chocolate is probably the most well-known spicy version. There are dozens of variations on what is called “authentic” or “traditional” Mexican hot chocolate, so this gringo can’t be sure of a precise recipe or ingredient, although the addition of some sort of chile, and usually cinnamon, appear to be a commonality. If fortunate, your local grocery store may have a Hispanic section selling Mexican chocolate, such as Abuelita by Nestle or Ibarra, in which case the spices are already added. But, if willing to make from scratch, this recipe sounds delicious:

mexican-hot-choc
*click for website recipe details

 

 

NOTE: Other Mexican hot chocolate recipes called for ancho chiles, Chimayo chiles, cayenne pepper, chili powder, and so on. I also stumbled across recipes for Mayan, Aztec, and Spanish hot chocolate, all of which seemed to be versions of Mexican hot chocolate.

Champurrado is a traditional Mexican drink served during Dia de los Muertos and Las Posadas. Like the traditional Mexican hot chocolate, champurrado also uses the Mexican chocolate tablets, but it adds other ingredients for a distinct beverage. Here is the website with the following video recipe: Living Mi Vida Loca

 

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