Floriography ~ C and D flowers

Floriography ~ C and D flowers

Continuing on with a study in Floriography  —  the cryptological communication through flower use or arrangement. For the first post covering A and B flowers, as well as a short history on the “language of flowers”, click HERE.   There’s fennel for you, and columbines: there’s rue for you; and here’s some for me: we… Continue Reading

Marriage Advice, Georgian-Style

Marriage Advice, Georgian-Style

Today’s humorous tidbit comes from “The Five Strange Wonders of the World” printed and sold in Bow-Church-Yard, London, between 1750 and 1785. Courtesy of the Lewis Walpole Library. Five Things a Man don’t like in a Wife A Woman who will cuckold her Husband She who carries false Tales from one to another She who… Continue Reading

Vocabulary Rocks! G is for…

Vocabulary Rocks! G is for…

Continuing my quest for strange words and phrases to uncover the etymology or origin stories. Gotta love language! Well, at least I do! For previous entries on this topic, a blog category search for “vocabulary” will bring up the archived posts. Enjoy! Gargoyle Gargoyle is a stone figure that forms part of the gutter system of… Continue Reading

La Moustache, 1815

La Moustache, 1815

Here we thought drawing a mustache on an unsuspecting friend was a camp prank alongside short-sheeting, or a college frat party stunt. Then there is my favorite example from Friends: Imagine my surprise to stumble across the image below on The History of Love. Apparently waiting until someone falls asleep and then drawing a fake moustache on them… Continue Reading

Chimney Sweeper Boys

Chimney Sweeper Boys

Way back to the 17th century the Master Sweepers of London would employ boys small enough to climb and scramble up chimney flues. The task for these climbing boys was to brush clean the inside of the flue with small hand-held brushes. They also used metal scrapers to remove the harder tar deposits left by… Continue Reading

Tipu Sultan’s Tiger

Tipu Sultan’s Tiger

For those who have read my novel The Passions of Dr. Darcy, you likely recall an encounter Dr. George Darcy and his mentor Dr. Kshitij Ullas had with Tipu Sultan, the infamous ruler of the Indian Kingdom of Mysore. My two characters are the product of imagination. Tipu Sultan, however, was real… and a very scary… Continue Reading